Causes of Low Testosterone in Women

Inadequate Production of Testosterone

The ovaries and adrenals are responsible for testosterone production. So, if these organs do not function properly or are removed, this can be a cause of low testosterone and will cause your testosterone levels to immediately drop by as much as 50%.

On the other hand, the pituitary gland of the brain is responsible for sending signals that instruct the ovaries and adrenals to manufacture testosterone. If a woman is afflicted with an illness that impairs the functioning of the pituitary gland, the ovaries and adrenals may be a cause of low testosterone or stop testosterone production altogether.

low libido (3)

Just getting older can have significant impacts on Testosterone production (just as in men). So, if you are above 45 or well into menopause then this could be the cause of your low testosterone levels.

Aging

Just getting older can have significant impacts on Testosterone production (just as in men). So, if you are above 45 or well into menopause then this could be the cause of your low testosterone levels.

Excessive Hormone Binding

A certain amount of testosterone attaches to the Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) which transports protein and hormones within the body. As SHBG binds more testosterone there is a decrease in available testosterone for the body to use and you start to suffer the symptoms of low testosterone. Certain factors can trigger this excessive binding:

  • Oral estrogens (including oral contraceptives, HRT tablets)
  • Thyroxine tablets
  • Increasing age
  • Alcohol
  • Smoking
  • Some anticonvulsants (e.g. phenytoin)
  • Pregnancy
  • Reduced liver function

Non-Hormonal Drugs that Interfere with Testosterone

It has been observed that there are certain medicines that counteract the benefits of testosterone. These are:

 

Medication Use Posssible Alternative
SSRI’s, tricyclics Depression
Oral oestrogens Oral contraceptive pill, HRT
Medroxyprogesterone Contraceptive, HRT Bioidentical Progesterone
Clonidine Hot flushes Bioidentical Progesterone
Spironolactone, Androcur Hirsutism
Danazol Endometriosis Bioidentical Progesterone
Benzodiazepines Anxiety, insomnia
Beta blockers Hypertension
H2 antagonists Oesophageal reflux
Ketoconazole Vuvlo-vaginal candidiasis
Gemfibrazol Hyperlipidaemia

 

Under no circumstances should patients change or cease taking medications without the consent of their doctor. If a patient is taking one or more of these medications and experiencing a lowered sexual desire he or she should consult their medical practitioner.

 

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Symptoms of Low Testosterone in Women