health and wellbeing

Fine Tune Your Health and Wellbeing

GARLIC

Eating raw garlic, at least twice a week, can cut lung cancer risk by 44 per cent, suggests an article in Cancer Prevention Research (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/prevention/garlic-and-cancer-prevention). A survey of lung cancer patients and healthy adults showed that even those who smoked cut their lung cancer risk by 30 per cent if they ate raw garlic. Scientists believe certain sulphur-containing compounds give garlic this property.

TAKE A BREAK

A recent analysis published by the Australia Institute found that three quarters of Aussies eat lunch at their desk. Not only does this mess with productivity, if you’re sitting on your arse (English Australian spelling so don’t get uppity – J) all day, you’re 40 per cent more likely to die within three years than people who sit for less than four hours, says an Aussie study in the Archives of Internal Medicine (http://www.comcare.gov.au/preventing/hazards/physical_hazards/sedentary_work).

RINSE

Rinsing your mouth with sports drink and then spitting it out can enhance your athletic performances as much as drinking it

Rinsing your mouth with sports drink and then spitting it out can enhance your athletic performances as much as drinking it

Rinsing your mouth with sports drink and then spitting it out can enhance your athletic performances as much as drinking it, says a study published in Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3179882). The study claims that the tongue may contain special carb receptors that communicate directly with the brain in ways that reduce perceived effort during exercise.

READ THE LABEL

What difference does a label make? None – UNLESS YOU ARE RICH! A study from the University of Greenwich, UK, (http://www2.gre.ac.uk/about/news/articles/2014-news/a2910-popcorn-research) found that people eating popcorn in a cinema ate the same amount whether it was labeled high fat, low fat or not labeled at all. But then researchers uncovered something that made them think hard – they found a large socioeconomic difference in behaviors. High income earners who worried about their weight ate more “low fat” popcorn than those who weren’t worried, but poorer subjects concerned about weight ate less.

GET MOVING

It’s less exercise, not more calories that’s turning us into fatties. A new study in the American Journal of Medicine (http://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343%2814%2900191-0/abstract) found that over the past 20 years there’s been a sharp decrease in exercise and an increase in average BMI, but caloric intake has stayed the same.

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